Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Black Bean Pumpkin Soup

A patient sent over this favorite recipe of hers from allrecipes.com. She said it delicious out of the pot and freezes really well too! She likes to use chicken broth which will add more flavor, for a vegan variation use vegetable or mushroom broth.

Ingredients
1/4 cup olive oil
1 cup chopped red onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 pinch ground allspice
4 cups vegetable, mushroom or chicken broth, divided
2 (15 ounce) cans black beans, rinsed and drained
1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 (16 ounce) can pumpkin puree
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, or more to taste

Directions
1. Combine olive oil, red onion, garlic, cumin, salt, cinnamon, black pepper, and allspice in a large pot over medium-low heat; cook and stir until onion and garlic are browned, about 5 minutes.
2. Combine 2 cups vegetable broth, black beans, and tomatoes in a blender; puree until smooth.
3. Pour remaining 2 cups vegetable broth, pureed black bean mixture, and pumpkin puree into the pot. Simmer soup, uncovered, until thick, 40 to 45 minutes. Stir in balsamic vinegar before serving.

ENJOY!!

Monday, April 2, 2018

Support Group Sweet Potato Hash

The Sweet Potato Hash was a success at support group! Try it for yourself. If you need a visual check out the photos on instagram @kimbaskitchen

Patients came to the conclusion that you could sub ground meat for beans and you could leave out the cumin if you want it have be less 'taco-y' and use herbs instead.


Sweet Potato Hash – serves 4 with leftovers for next day
2 tablespoons olive oil
½ cup onion, diced
2 large sweet potatoes/yams, shredded
1-2 10oz cans black beans, rinsed (depends on ratio of beans to potato you would like)
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon turmeric
1 tablespoon paprika
Optional: fresh jalapenos diced, 3 slices bacon – cooked crispy, drained on paper towels
Avocado slices

1.       Heat oil in pan over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until fragrant about 3 minutes.
2.       Add sweet potatoes, beans, spices and any of the optional ingredients. Cook approx. 10 min, stirring frequently.
3.       Serve topped with slices of avocado

Other Options:
1.       Have as a side dish at dinner with chicken or steak
2.       Reheat in the morning and top with a poached egg and some salsa
3.       Add to salad for lunch


Tuesday, February 27, 2018

What are Healthy Fats?

Blog entry for Lifespan's Spring Newsletter. All Lifespan blog entries on a variety of health topics can be found here: https://www.lifespan.org/news-events/lifespan-blog/what-are-healthy-fats



February 27, 2018

What are Healthy Fats?

Category: 
NutritionWeight LossCardiology and Cardiac SurgeryHealth Tips

Over the years, oils and fats have gotten a bad rap. Even today, the perception that “fats make people fat” still persists.
Before we tackle this myth, we must first explain the difference between foods that are “fatty” versus “high-fat.” Fatty foods are man-made items, such as highly processed oils or packaged foods and deep-fried items. By contrast, high-fat foods are those that naturally contain large amounts of fat per serving – more than five grams of fat in a serving.
There are also two kinds of high-fat foods: those that are high in saturated fats and those with unsaturated fats. Typically, animal proteins like red meat and pork are higher in saturated fats.
But did you know that the fat profile of meat is purely a result of the animal’s diet? Imagine that you have two types of farm-raised animals: one is given fatty feeds in areas called “feed lots” while the other is “free range” and eats only grasses. The fatty feeds contain processed oils high in saturated fats, which then causes the meat to contain high amounts of saturated fats. On the other hand, grasses have an omega (unsaturated) fat profile. Animals raised in pasture who never see a feed lot will have an “omega fat profile” instead of a “saturated fat profile.”
The same is true of farm-raised versus wild-caught fish. Farm-raised fish have a higher saturated fat profile due to their fatty diet, whereas wild-caught fish have an omega fat profile from eating krill, plankton, and sea grasses. Even in the animal kingdom, the type of fat consumed matters when it comes to health!

The skinny on fat

Fat is a necessary part of our diets and is required for many functions in your body. In fact, fat is needed to absorb and store key vitamins. Vitamins A, D, E, and K all require dietary intake of fat for proper absorption and storage.
Many who strive for a fat-free lifestyle may face issues because their bodies could not get the needed vitamins. This can result in poor eye sight, bone density issues, problems with the nervous system, poor skin health, and bleeding risks.

What is a “good fat?”

How do you know which fats are saturated or unsaturated? The easiest way to find out is to leave it out on the counter. If the item is still solid at room temperature, it is a saturated fat. Butter and coconut oil are two examples. But if the item is a liquid, it is an unsaturated fat.
Let us look at some healthy fat choices for your diet. These will help to keep your body running smoothly.
  • Olive oil: This popular oil is probably the most commonly known “good” fat source, and is readily available. There are two popular kinds of olive oil: the green one, which is Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO), and the yellow one, which is just olive oil. EVOO is made from the first pressing of the fruit and has the most flavor. However, this version should only be added after the food is cooked. Because EVOO burns easily, it is not recommended to heat it. That is why it is commonly used for salad dressing. Yellow olive oil is a better choice for cooking as it has a higher smoke point, which means it will not burn as fast.
  • Avocado oil: Many people eat avocados, but few are aware that you can buy avocado oil. It is another great addition to salads or can be drizzled over roasted vegetables or grilled chicken breasts. Like EVOO, you should not heat avocado oil as it can burn. If you prefer avocados themselves, they are an abundant source of healthy unsaturated fats. Add them to salads, tacos, chicken, swordfish, or steaks. Or try the new trend: avocado toast! Prepare with a squeeze of lemon and a sprinkle of sea salt on a slice of hearty-multigrain toast.
  • Flax seed oil: Many people are less aware of this oil. Flax seeds are very common toppers for breakfast cereals or in breads, but because it has a strong flavor, their oil can be just as useful. Avoid heating flax seed oil. In fact, it should be kept in the refrigerator as it goes rancid easily with temperature fluctuations. You can add it to oatmeal, cream of wheat, or muesli in the morning or drizzle it on toast with honey and peanut butter. Men should be cautious of flax intake, though, as some studies have shown that it can be harmful for prostate health.
  • Walnut oil: This is another great oil for salads or breakfast cereals. Like some other oils, walnut oil cannot be heated, but its flavor is best when added just prior to eating. Compared to other oils such as avocado, almond or sesame, this oil tastes truest to its source -- walnuts.
  • Sesame oil: This is a reliable, healthy oil for cooking. You only need a little to get a lot of flavor and you can heat it unlike most of the other oils listed. As an added bonus, sesame seeds have the highest content of calcium per serving than any other food. Even though you can heat sesame, you should store it in the refrigerator to ensure freshness.
  • Fish oil: Most people avoid using fish oil for cooking because of the excessive flavor. But the health benefits of fish oil have long been known. Cod liver oil was the first marketed fish oil product for health and, while it might have been miserable to swallow, it did keep people quite healthy. Now, fish oil supplements are available to help maintain heart health and immune system function.
  • Nuts: Go nuts for these little powerhouses! A handful of almonds or chopped walnuts as a snack, on top of a salad, or in yogurt give you the healthy fats your body needs and extra flavor for your meal.
Go ahead, add these healthier oils to your list. For more tips on heart-healthy eating, visit our website.

Monday, January 29, 2018

CBS February Newsletter Recipe - Chocolate Chia Seed Pudding

Just because you missed support group, doesn't mean you should have to miss out on the recipe! Sara's pick recipe of the month from the Yummy Mummy Kitchen .

Chia seeds are a nutrient-rich food that is packed with omega 3 fatty acids, fiber, numerous vitamins and minerals such as manganese and phosphorus and even protein. In fact, just one serving (2 Tbsp.) of chia seeds contains 10 grams of dietary fiber, 6 grams of protein and provides 10% of the daily value for iron. Chia seeds can easily be added to smoothies, yogurts and hot cereals such as oatmeal. Enjoy this recipe for a healthy Valentine’s Day chocolate treat.


Serves: About 2

Ingredients & Materials Needed:
•Mason jar with lid (or other small container with lid)
•1 cup (8 oz.) unsweetened vanilla almond milk
(or other fat free/low fat milk of choice)
1.5 Tbsp. unsweetened cacao powder
3 Tbsp. chia seeds
Stevia to taste (start with about 1Tbsp.)
Optional toppings: Fresh raspberries or strawberries,
chopped walnuts, unsweetened coconut flakes or
a dollop of fat free whipped topping

Instructions:
1.Place almond milk, chia seeds, cacao and stevia to taste into a canning jar and cover with the lid. Shake until well combined or stir thoroughly with a spoon. Place in the refrigerator overnight or at least 8 hours.
2.Divide into two servings. Serve as is or top with any optional toppings listed above.

ENJOY!!!

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Part II from the 10/24/17 Support Group with Sara Stiles, RD, LDN. This recipe was also taste tested at group. The turmeric-date balls can be used as part of a breakfast, snack or dessert! You could add a little ground cinnamon (I prefer Saigon Cinnamon) for extra anti-inflammatory help and for a little extra flavor.

Anti-Inflammatory Turmeric Date Balls


Makes about 8-10 balls
 

Ingredients and Equipment Needed:
§  1/3 cup walnuts
§  1/2 cup rolled/old fashioned oats
§  1 Tbsp. ground turmeric (plus extra for rolling)
§  1 cup soft pitted dates
§  Stevia to taste
§  1-2 pinches of black pepper
§  High speed blender



Instructions:
1)      In a high speed blender, add the walnuts, oats, turmeric, stevia and black pepper and blend until thoroughly broken down.
2)      Add in the dates and blend for about 5-10 seconds.  It is acceptable to see tiny chunks of the dates in the mixture.
3)      Shape and roll desired amount of the mixture into balls and roll each ball into more turmeric to evenly coat.
4)      Store in air tight container (preferably in the refrigerator).  May also be stored in the freezer as well.


Spotlight on Turmeric:
§  Contains the active compound curcumin which numerous studies have showcased it’s power in reducing inflammation. Many studies are now investigating curcumin’s effects as a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.
§  Turmeric use has been associated with increased wound healing as well as helping to control psoriasis flare-ups.
§  Studies has shown the effectiveness of turmeric’s curcumin on arthritis management (including rheumatoid arthritis).

§  More natural sources for pain relief as opposed to NSAIDs or acetaminophen. 

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Mango-Matcha Green Tea Smoothie

If you missed support group with Sara Stiles, RD, LDN on 10/24/17, don't fear we have the recipe and handout right here for you!! You might have missed the taste test but you can try it at home for yourself.

Mango Matcha Green Smoothie
from www.MyLifeCookbook.com   


Serves 1

Ingredients & Equipment Needed:
§  ½ avocado
§  ½ teaspoon matcha green tea powder
§  ½ cup mango (can be frozen mango chunks)
§  2 handfuls of baby spinach (or other leafy green of preference)
§  1 cup unsweetened almond milk
§  Stevia (natural calorie free sweetener) to taste
§  High speed blender


Instructions:
1)      Add all the ingredients except the avocado to a high speed blender and blend thoroughly for about 1-2 minutes.
2)      Then add the avocado and blend until creamy and smooth.   Feel free to add additional almond milk or water in small amounts if mixture is too thick.



Spotlight on Match Green Tea:
§  Rich in catechins, a type of antioxidant that can help with the body’s detoxification system as well as defend against cancer.  It is reported that one cups of matcha green tea contains as much antioxidants as 10 cups of regular
green tea.

§  Contains L-theanine, a type of non-essential amino acid found mostly in teas.  L-theanine has been shown to increased levels of dopamine and GABA in the brain which can help promote a sense of calm and even improve anxiety. 



Monday, October 30, 2017

CBS November Newsletter Recipe: Cinnamon Turmeric Roasted Sweet Potatoes

FEATURED RECIPE OF THE MONTH
Cinnamon Turmeric Roasted Sweet Potatoes
From One Green Planet at www.onegreenplanet.org


Ingredients & Materials Needed:
§Large bowl
§Spatula or large spoon
§Baking sheet (sprayed with cooking spray)
§3 medium-large sweet potatoes
§2 Tbsp. ground turmeric
§2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon (Ceylon or Saigon)
§2 Tbsp. dried thyme
§2-4 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
§Salt & pepper to taste
§
Instructions:
1)Preheat the oven to 400º F. 
2)Peel and cut the sweet potatoes into bite size pieces. Place the potatoes in the large bowl and evenly drizzle the 2-4 Tbsp. of extra virgin olive oil over all of the potatoes.
3)Next, sprinkle all of the spices over the potatoes and toss thoroughly to evenly coat with the olive oil and spices.
4)Spread the potatoes out onto the spray baking sheets. Be sure to avoid over-crowding and over-lapping of the potatoes.
Cook for 45-60 minutes, or until the potatoes start lightly browning. 

ENJOY!!!